Global Christianity Since 1700

THL330

This subject introduces students to rudimentary features of Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek. It acquaints students with the alphabets of both Hebrew and Greek, familiarises them with basic grammatical features of both languages and facilitates the learning of elementary vocabulary. The subject orients students to the range of grammatical and lexical tools available to support the use of scholarly resources based on Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek. It also raises student awareness of interpretive implications arising from cultural dimensions of biblical texts preserved in ancient languages.


Duration

One Semester

Availability

Semester 2 every even year

Subject Points

8

Core/Elective

Elective

Delivery Mode

On site at St Francis College Milton

Prerequisites

THL131 and THL132

To be advised by the CSU Subject Outline for the appropriate semester

Prescribed Texts


To be advised by the CSU Subject Outline for the appropriate semester

Assessments


Content

This subject will cover the following topics:

  • an introduction to the historiography of contemporary world Christianity

  • contemporary issues in the sociology and history of religion

  • Christian missions and their relationship with race and empire

  • the impact upon Western Christianity of the Enlightenment, science, industrialisation and
    secularism

  • the ecumenical movement

  • the inculturation of Christianity, with special reference to African, Asian or Pacific Christianity

  • poverty, social justice and political struggle in the non-Western world

  • theology and history, with special reference to liberationist, feminist, post-colonial, and
    ecumenical theologians

  • Christianity and nationalism

  • Christianity and other faiths

  • Christian fundamentalism

  • the rise of Pentecostalism


Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:

  • be able to demonstrate an understanding of the context of Christianity's global expansion after
    1700

  • be able to demonstrate an understanding of major themes in the global expansion of Christianity

  • be able to discuss and evaluate critically how contemporary Christianity has become a largely
    non-Western faith

  • be able to develop a basic taxonomy of world Christianities

  • be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the issues surrounding the inculturation of
    the Christian faith

  • be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of religion in the development of national
    identity

  • be able to demonstrate critical engagement with historical claims made about the religious past

  • be able to exhibit advanced shills in historical enquiry

  • be able to demonstrate self guided and collaborative learning